Web Design

Five Outstanding Legal Website Designs

Lawyer’s websites can be bland, boring, and full of legal mumbo jumbo. Anyone looking at legal sites can find the general messages such as aggressive representation and experience. However, we’ve put together a list of interesting sites that take a unique approach to communicating what they do.

Kottler Law

(www.kottlerlaw.com)

For any comic lover, this site will grab your attention the moment you open the page.  The entire top of the front page is an engaging comic strip that plays out in front of you, relating to the services Kottler law firm provides. The page sticks to the comic theme for page navigation as well. Everything from their blog to the homepage can be reached through a comic’s stereotypical dialogue box. However, the boxes can make navigation difficult and the pages have a lot of text to look through. All the same, their approach is a refreshing change from the traditional images of injury and attorneys in suits found on many legal pages today.

Prairie Law Group

(http://www.edulaw.com/)

The Prairie group’s site offers simplistic entire-page images that won’t distract a user, yet keep the page itself attractive. The navigation is also simplistic enough, with only five options which don’t break into a multitude of other clickable options. The home page immediately tells you with two sentences of text on the page what the firm is about and its experience.  Even the URL helps a user know what they’re about, before even visiting the page itself.

The other pages are a bit heavier on text, but don’t overdo it. With the shades of grey color scheme as well as the short and concise page explanations, Prairie Law Group does a great job in maintaining a simple look with a layout that doesn’t hurt readability.

Harvis Wright Saleem & Fett

(www.hwsflegal.com)

The hwsf site’s home page is to the point. Users immediately can find the focus on civil rights and criminal defense law. With only four major navigational options, the page isn’t overwhelming either. It also provides a picture lay out of the area (New York City) in which they practice, aiding in association through images. The central animated display in the center though takes away from this. Furthermore, the clips used in the center go so fast, and lack needed context, that the effect of the center animation seems to go to waste.

Harrison Pensa

(http://harrisonpensa.com/)

The non-flash animation makes viewing the page and reading content easier. The black and white lay out also keeps it simple for any user. Having two layers of six option page navigation, one above the other, can cause some confusion. Also unlike most legal pages, the types of law practiced by the firm are not inherently clear upon reaching the home page. The website does integrate itself well to link up with social media outlets easily, no requiring much searching or navigating on the user’s part. The interior pages are also organized in a clear logical manner with a large amount of content for users to look through. So many types of content to look through does give visitors options and increases the chances of having something relevant to a potential client’s need, but it is runs the risk of being overwhelming as well.

Thompson Coburn

(www.thompsoncoburn.com)

The Thompson Coburn page offers a minimalistic take on legal sites. From the start, you’ll notice no massive images or overuse of text on the home page. The navigation tool bar has seven options, each clear in purpose and easy to interpret. Less can mean more in Thompson Coburn’s case. The same isn’t applied to the interior pages, some of which have long pages of content and many options. Again there is the usual risk of overwhelming a user, but it does display the large variety of legal services the firm provides.

Blair Carroll is an attorney at Carroll Troberman Criminal Defense in Austin, Texas and a member of the prestigious National College for DUI Defense. The Carroll Troberman team offers the full spectrum in DWI and criminal defense to clients, utilizing the experience of a past prosecutor as well familiarity with the judges and prosecutors of central Texas.

Comments are closed.